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‘We were told Brexit would be an apocalypse. It’s not!’ French open eyes to EU shambles

The news accompanies a video interview in which candidate and “Frexiteer” Francois Asselineau, a member of the Popular Republican Union said Brexit was “not the apocalypse we were told it would be”. The interview that took place on 4V, saw Mr Asselineau slam French President Emmanuel Macron for fabricating a hypothesis surrounding a post-Brexit Britain.

He said: “Do you remember what Macron said to us? That Brexit would never happen and if it did, it would be a disaster and so on.

“Macron even said that he would have the red carpet ready for the hundreds of thousands of people working in the city of London who would cross the Channel to settle and take refuge here in France.

“What has happened one year after Brexit?”

In a chilling warning to French voters, he continued: “The UK has 4.5 percent unemployment, half the amount of France.

“No, but wait. Did I dream it or not? We were told that Brexit would be the apocalypse, but it is not the apocalypse! The UK’s growth is higher than our growth.”

Speaking of how the UK has emerged stronger since Brexit, the presidential candidate said: “We were told that the UK would isolate itself from the rest of the world and it’s not true.

“Google, Boeing and Shell have transferred their headquarters to London.

“The City has regained its position as Europe’s leading financial centre and the French know very well that migrants want to enter the UK.”

Mr Asselineau then commented on the UK’s stance across the international arena, saying: “We were told that in international matters, the UK would isolate itself and not at all.

“With the United States and Australia it made an alliance and this is the origin of us losing the contract for the submarines in Australia.”

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He then ended with a damming appraisal of the European Union, saying: “And what did the EU do for France?

“It didn’t lift a finger. That’s the reality of the situation.”

The European Union has expressed concerns at the possibility of a Frexit, and the potential election of Marine Le Pen as President.

European Commissioner Pierre Moscovici told Euractive France that electing Ms Le Pen and leaving the EU would deal a fatal blow to the European project.

Mr Moscovici said: “Look at the worrying trend going on in France in terms of Europe, Euroscepticism is undoubtedly a force to be reckoned with.

“But I would still make a distinction between Marine Le Pen and the others.
“Madame Le Pen represents a nationalist faction that wants ‘Frexit’; France to leave the EU and the euro.

“In my view, that is a fatal position to take for Europe and a terrible one for France.”

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Adding to the potential collapse of the European economy should France leave the bloc, Grégory Clayes, a researcher at Bruegel, said: “Frexit would lead to a freezing of financial flows and bring the global financial system to a cardiac arrest.

“The failure of Lehman Brothers could look like a small shock in comparison, and even that had major real economic implication.”

Far-right candidate Eric Zemmour says France does not have what it takes to pull through with Frexit.

Mr Zemmour lauded Brexit but said that France lacked the confidence to follow Britain’s example, partly because of its poor war record.

The controversial TV celebrity turned politician said that although he backed Brexiteers’ view of the European Union, which he called a “pure technostructure that has got rid of the people”, and shared their determination to reclaim control of national borders, he will keep France in the bloc if he wins the presidency this spring.

Additional reporting by Maria Ortega


www.express.co.uk

Daily Express

The Daily Express is a daily national middle-market tabloid newspaper in the United Kingdom. Published in London, it is the flagship of Express Newspapers, owned by publisher Reach plc. It was first published as a broadsheet in 1900 by Sir Arthur Pearson. Its sister paper, the Sunday Express, was launched in 1918.

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