Entertainment

$6.5M offer made on Don Rickles’ longtime home after only a week on the market

The Los Angeles home owned by comedy legend Don Rickles since 1989 hit the market one week ago at $6.5 million and is already seeing a potential buyer.

Rickles, who passed away at the age of 90 in 2017 from kidney failure, had purchased the property for $2.17 million at the time.

His wife of 53 years, Barbara Rickles, remained in the home until her death earlier this March. She was 84.

The estate was then listed on June 13 for the first time since they both passed, property records show. By June 21, it was already pending an offer.

Made up of four bedrooms and five bathrooms, the 5,600-square-foot residence is one of 36 Mediterranean-style homes in Century Woods Estates, an upscale gated enclave. 

The iconic insult comic talked to The Post from the home in 2015, when he told us he had no intention of retiring anytime soon, “unless, God forbid, my health goes bad. I had a bum leg, it got some disease on it — it’s a long story — but now I sit in a chair with a cane and they still laugh so I’m happy about that. And if I don’t do standup, I’ll be sitting in a chair and taking questions and talking about my life. As long as they show up and see me.”

Barbara and Don Rickles attend the Hollywood Reporter reception saluting Don Rickles and John Landis on March 1, 2007 at Matsuhisa in Aspen, Colorado.
Barbara and Don Rickles in 2007.
Getty Images
Don Rickles and Barbara Sklar kiss at the Los Angeles Lakers vs Cleveland Cavaliers game at the Staples Center on January 19, 2009 in Los Angeles, California.
Don Rickles and Barbara Sklar kiss at the Los Angeles Lakers vs. Cleveland Cavaliers game at the Staples Center on Jan. 19, 2009 in Los Angeles, California.
Getty Images
The home spans over 5,600 square feet.
The home spans over 5,600 square feet.
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The courtyard.
The courtyard.
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The grand foyer.
The grand foyer.
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The bar.
The bar.
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The elevator.
The elevator.
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Pegged as a “rare opportunity” to own, the home features a dramatic two-story entry with a sweeping staircase, hardwood floors and a large living room with a hand-carved stone fireplace imported from Europe.

Amenities include a paneled library/den, a glass-mirrored wet bar, a gourmet center island kitchen with commercial appliances and an elevator.

The owner’s suite comes with a sitting area, an outdoor private patio, dual baths, spa tub and large walk-in closets.

The kitchen.
The kitchen.
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The formal living room with a built-in fireplace.
The formal living room with a built-in fireplace.
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The primary bedroom.
The primary bedroom.
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The main ensuite bath.
The main en suite bath.
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A patio.
The private bedroom patio.
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Shortly after his death, Rickles’ coastal estate in Malibu’s Point Dume sold to Equinox founder Donato Errico for $6.5 million.

Kurt Rappaport of Westside Estate Agency holds the listing.

Sharon Stone, Don Rickles, Robert De Niro, Charlie Steiner in the 1995 movie "Casino."
Sharon Stone, Don Rickles and Robert De Niro in the 1995 movie “Casino.”
©Universal/Courtesy Everett Col
Howard Stern, Don Rickles, host David Letterman, on The Late Show on May 7, 2015.
Howard Stern, Don Rickles and host David Letterman on the Late Show on May 7, 2015.
©CBS/Courtesy Everett Collectio

Born and raised in Queens, Rickles was long known for his insult comedy. The stand-up comic and actor gained fame for his aggressive style of humor on “The Dean Martin Show” and “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.”

He later enjoyed a long career as a Las Vegas headliner. His film credits include “Casino” and the “Toy Story” movies.

Don Rickles with Jerry Seinfeld in an episode of "Comedian In Cars Getting Coffee," which aired in 2018.
Don Rickles with Jerry Seinfeld in an episode of “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” which aired in 2013.
Netflix

Rickles also appeared on Jerry Seinfeld’s “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” which premiered in 2013.

In 2014, he was honored by Spike TV for its “One Night Only” special after spending six weeks in the hospital a year prior with a flesh-eating disease, which he underwent eight operations for, including skin grafts on his leg.

However, despite his enduring fame, Rickles was unable to parlay it into a regular prime-time TV series power position like many of his standup comedy peers.

“They were never able to catch on with me, with my image — it was tough to write how I am,” ” he told The Post in 2015. “The dramatic stuff always went over big, but I never had luck with comedy. The people around me were great, but somebody said I was ‘too strong’ on TV — not with the language or what I said, but with my attitude. At that time I was comparatively young for TV … so it was difficult for me. I didn’t feel that way, but that’s the way it went.”

nypost.com

New York Post

The New York Post is a daily tabloid newspaper in New York City. The Post also operates NYPost.com, the celebrity gossip site PageSix.com and the entertainment site Decider.com.

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